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Isolated Strong Storms Could Become Severe

| 5:33 pm March 26, 2015

3-26-2015 5-32-16 PM

Strong storms are occurring this afternoon over Central Alabama from Bibb County southwestward to near Demopolis and Uniontown.

They are moving northeast at 35 mph and will affect Shelby County, starting around Montevallo then moving to near Alabaster and Calera.

The storms have copious lightning and heavy rain as well as some small hail and gusty winds. Hail to near 1 inch may be falling in a hail core crossing AL-5 just north of Centreville.

The stronger storms could become severe, especially the Bibb-Shelby storm, but overall the threat is isolated. The SPC has included the area from Aliceville to Tuscaloosa to Hoover to Millerville to Montgomery and points southwest in the new marginal severe weather risk category. This is the old See Text category, which is for isolated severe weather threats.

Mid-Afternoon Update

| 2:40 pm March 22, 2015

Rain continues over much of the northern third of Alabama this afternoon, generally north of I-20.

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Rainfall amounts have been light to moderate. including:

.28 at Birmingham
.59 at Tusacaloosa
.23 at Anniston

Temperatures are in the upper 50s in the I-20 Corridor. They will fall back into the lower 50s tonight under cloudy skies.

The precipitation is associated with a nice little upper level disturbance northeast of Little Rock. It will push east northeast, ending the main rain from the west over western Alabama by 5-6 p.m., in the I-65 corridor between 7-8 p.m. and over East Alabama a couple of hours later.

But a few light showers will be possible during the overnight hours, ending from the northwest during the pre-dawn hours, around sunrise in the I-59 corridor and over southeastern sections during the morning.

Expect to see some sunshine Monday, at least by afternoon. Highs tomorrow will range from the upper 60s around Hamilton, where sunshine will arrive earlier, to the middle 60s in the I-20 Corridor to the lower 60s around Auburn.

Boston Breaks Snowfall Record for Season!

| 8:41 pm March 15, 2015

It is official! Just under three inches of snow fell late this afternoon and evening at Boston’s Logan Airport, surpassing the old seasonal snowfall total.

This graphic does not yet reflect the updated total, but shows 125 years of snowfall records in Beantown.

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If the GFS is right, they may increase their snowfall total even further next weekend! The model has been predicting some light snows next weekend.

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TAUNTON MA
719 PM EDT SUN MAR 15 2015

…BOSTON BREAKS ALL TIME SEASONAL SNOW RECORD…

AS OF 7PM ON MARCH 15TH…BOSTON LOGAN AIRPORT RECIEVED 108.6
INCHES OF TOTAL SEASONAL SNOWFALL. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF
107.6 INCHES FOR THE 1995-1996 WINTER SEASON.

$$

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Perfect Today. Even More So Tomorrow.

| 12:55 pm March 15, 2015

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Alright. You just have to get out side on this Sunday afternoon. I know there is the SEC and other Basketball Championships. It is Selection Sunday. But do not miss this chance to get outside.

It seemed the southeastern United States was on Sunrise Watch this morning as folks tweeted gorgeous photographs of the sky from places like Austin, Perdido Key, Pensacola Beach, Surfside, SC and Helena. Sme folks had their view of the gorgeous sunrise blocked by fog. That fog burned off quickly and a gorgeous day has taken shape across Central Alabama.

Regional radars have indeed taken the day off as just a few high clouds stream across from time to time, barely blocking the strong late winter sun. Temperatures will warm into the 70s areawide this afternoon. Winds are light. Humidities are low. All in all a perfect day weatherwise.

And if you like today, add about 3 or 4 degrees, shake and serve. Another perfect day. Better make reservations now for your favorite outdoor restaurant. Tuesday looks great too. Rain returns late Wednesday with showers lingering into the weekend.

Rain and Storms Pushing Through Central Alabama

| 2:29 pm March 10, 2015

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An area of rain and some thunderstorms has developed over southeastern Mississippi and West Alabama. It is moving northeast, tracking along and just south of I-59. The storms are located along the southern periphery of the precipitation area, drawing on slightly unstable air to the south where temperatures have soared into the 70s and 80s. CAPE values are running over 1,000 j/kg in the warmer air.

It is 82F at Montgomery this hour. The record high there is 86F for today.

The strongest storms are from west of Centreville to west of Marion to east of Linden in Marengo County. They are not severe, but could produce some strong wind gusts. Can’t rule out an isolated severe storm until the storms get into slightly cooler air up over Shelby County and points northeast, but the chance looks small.

The thunderstorm activity will track northeast, affecting mainly Bibb, Marion and Dallas Counties moving into Shelby, Chilton and Autauga Counties over the next hour. There could be some thunder over southern Jefferson County as well, south of I-459. Rain will impact areas along I-59 from the Tuscaloosa area on to the northeast through the Birmingham Metro.

Scroll down for James’ complete update on the forecast

The Ash Wednesday Storm

| 9:00 am March 7, 2015

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Ash Wednesday is the High Holy Day signifying the beginning of the Lenten period. Ash Wednesday in 1962 was on March 7th. On that day, an unusual series of factors were coming together to create an especially bad situation along the U.S. East Coast.

First, there was a new moon, which meant spring tides along the coast that “sprung” higher than they normally would. In addition, twice every 29.5 days, the Earth is aligned with the sun and the moon and the gravitational pull on the tides is greater, making the tidal range higher. This is called syzygy. At syzygy, high tides are higher than they normally would be.

The third factor was that the moon was at perigee. The moon’s orbit around the Earth is not perfectly circular. It is shaped more like an oval. The Earth is located closer to one end than the other, meaning that once during each orbit, the moon is much closer to Earth than at other times. Nearly 225,000 miles closer in fact. When the Earth and moon are at the closest point, it is called perigee.

Again, the proximity of the moon results in higher tides than normal. The two events occur within 36 hours of each other a few times each year. On this date in 1962, they were within 30 minutes of one another. By themselves, these two events would not cause very much trouble, but they occurred simultaneously with a huge late season nor’easter, known as the Great Atlantic Storm to meteorologists.

Locals christened it the Ash Wednesday Storm. Its forward progress blocked by high pressure to the north, for three days beginning on Ash Wednesday, the huge extratropical storm unleashed its fury without warning from North Carolina to New England. With each succeeding high tide, water levels rose higher and higher, inundating beachfront communities. Massive waves pounded 500 miles of beach, eroding the dunes.

When it was over, 1,800 structures were destroyed. Damages totaled $500 million. Forty people died.