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Central Alabama 7 Day Forecast

Archive for November 13th, 2012

Some Clouds Tomorrow, But We Stay Dry

| 3:18 pm November 13, 2012

An all new edition of the ABC 33/40 Weather Xtreme video is available in the player on the right sidebar of the blog. You can subscribe to the Weather Xtreme video on iTunes by clicking here.

COLD AGAIN TONIGHT: With a clear sky and light wind, temperatures will fall quickly across Alabama tonight, and colder places will wind up at or below freezing again early tomorrow. Most communities will see a low in the mid 30s.

Clouds invade Alabama tomorrow ahead of a strong short wave, but the low levels stay dry and the chance of any rain reaching the ground is so small we won’t mention any chance of wet weather. The weather stays cool with a high in the mid 50s, about ten degrees below average for mid-November in Alabama.

THURSDAY: As low pressure forms off the South Atlantic Coast, there is some evidence the sky could remain generally cloudy, which would keep temperatures in the 50s again. The dry low level air still means no rain for most of the state.

FRIDAY THROUGH SUNDAY: These days should feature cool fall weather, with partly to mostly sunny days and fair nights. Highs will be in the 60 to 64 degree range, and early morning lows mostly in the 40s, although the colder spots should reach the 30s most mornings. Dry air means no chance of rain.

THANKSGIVING WEEK: See the Weather Xtreme video for the graphics and details, but generally speaking, at least for now, the week looks pretty calm around here. We might need to mention some risk of a shower Tuesday through Thursday, but moisture is pretty shallow, and dynamics are weak, so rain amounts, if any, shouldn’t be too heavy, and there is no threat of severe weather.

The negative NAO (North Atlantic Oscillation) does tend to favor some cold air flooding down into the eastern U.S. a time or two over the latter half of the month.

FOOTBALL WEATHER: Looks great for the high school playoff games Friday night; the sky will be clear with temperatures falling from near 55 at kickoff into the 40s by halftime.

Alabama will host Western Carolina Saturday morning at Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa (11:21 a.m. kickoff)… the sky will be mostly sunny, with temperatures rising from near 60 at kickoff to 64 at the final snap. Auburn hosts Alabama A&M at 1:00 Saturday afternoon… there will be a good supply of sunshine during the game; the kickoff temperature will be near 63 degrees, falling into the 50s by the fourth quarter as the sun goes low on the horizon.

Very similar weather for the UAB/Memphis game Saturday afternoon at Legion Field (1:00 kickoff); lots of sunshine with a kickoff temperature near 64 degrees, but falling into the 50s late in the game as darkness nears.

WEATHER BRAINS: Don’t forget you can listen to our weekly 90 minute netcast anytime on the web, or on iTunes. This is the show all about weather featuring many familiar voices, including our meteorologists here at ABC 33/40. Scroll down for the show notes on this week’s new episode recorded last night.

CONNECT: You can find me on all of the major social networks…

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I had a great time today visiting with the kids at Striplin Elementary School in Gadsden… be looking for those kids on the Pepsi KIDCAM today at 5:00 on ABC 33/40 News! The next Weather Xtreme video will be posted here bright and early tomorrow morning by 7:00 a.m….

Winter Weather Awareness Week – Terminology

| 6:51 am November 13, 2012

Today is the second day of Winter Weather Awareness Week in Alabama. This week is an educational effort to increase people’s awareness and understanding of winter weather threats along with the actions necessary to be prepared and safe. Todays topic is a look at winter weather terminology.

-Brian-


PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BIRMINGHAM AL
549 AM CST TUE NOV 13 2012

...THIS WEEK IS WINTER WEATHER AWARENESS WEEK IN ALABAMA...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AND THE ALABAMA STATE EMERGENCY
MANAGEMENT AGENCY HAVE PROCLAIMED THE WEEK OF NOVEMBER 12TH THROUGH
NOVEMBER 16TH, 2012 AS WINTER WEATHER AWARENESS WEEK IN ALABAMA.
WINTER WEATHER AWARENESS WEEK HIGHLIGHTS THE NEED FOR BEING PREPARED
FOR THE POTENTIAL DANGERS OF A SEVERE WINTER WEATHER EPISODE.

...TODAY'S TOPIC IS WINTER WEATHER TERMINOLOGY...

WHEN OLD MAN WINTER THREATENS, THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE URGES
EVERYONE TO KEEP ABREAST OF LOCAL FORECASTS AND WARNINGS AND TO
BECOME FAMILIAR WITH KEY WINTER WEATHER TERMINOLOGY.

WINTER STORM OUTLOOK...THESE OUTLOOKS ARE ISSUED WITHIN THE HAZARDOUS
WEATHER OUTLOOK (HWO) PRODUCT. WINTER WEATHER HAZARDS ARE MENTIONED
WHEN CONDITIONS ARE FAVORABLE FOR A SIGNIFICANT HAZARDOUS WINTER
WEATHER EVENT TO DEVELOP OVER PART OR ALL OF CENTRAL ALABAMA IN THE 3
TO 7 DAY FORECAST PERIOD. THE MAIN OBJECTIVE OF THE OUTLOOK IS TO
INFORM USERS OF THE POTENTIAL OF AN UPCOMING WINTER EVENT, ESPECIALLY
FOR THOSE WHO NEED CONSIDERABLE LEAD TIME TO PREPARE.

WINTER STORM WATCH...THESE POTENTIAL WINTER EVENTS ARE EXPECTED IN
THE 12 TO 48 HOUR TIME FRAME. FOR SNOW, WHEN MORE THAN 2 INCHES OF
SNOW ARE POSSIBLE IN A 12 HOUR TIME FRAME. FOR FREEZING RAIN OR
FREEZING DRIZZLE, ICE ACCUMULATIONS OF 0.25 INCH OR MORE. FOR SLEET,
ACCUMULATIONS OF ICE PELLETS ONE INCH OR MORE. FOR WIND CHILL, WIND
CHILLS OF -10 DEGREES OR COLDER.

WINTER STORM WARNING...THESE ARE WARNINGS THAT ARE ISSUED WHEN
HAZARDOUS WINTER WEATHER IS OCCURRING, IS IMMINENT OR HAS A HIGH
PROBABILITY OF OCCURRENCE. THESE POTENTIAL WINTER EVENTS ARE EXPECTED
IN THE 0 TO 36 HOUR TIME FRAME. FOR SNOW, WHEN MORE THAN 2 INCHES OF
SNOW ARE POSSIBLE IN A 12 HOUR TIME FRAME. FOR FREEZING RAIN OR
FREEZING DRIZZLE, ICE ACCUMULATIONS OF 0.25 INCHES OR MORE. FOR
SLEET, ACCUMULATIONS OF ICE PELLETS 1 INCH OR MORE. FOR WIND CHILL,
WIND CHILLS OF -10 DEGREES OR COLDER. IF FORECASTERS CONFIDENCE IN A
PREDOMINANT PRECIPITATION TYPE IS HIGH, THE WINTER STORM WARNINGS CAN
BE EVENT SPECIFIC SUCH AS HEAVY SNOW WARNING, SLEET WARNING AND ICE
STORM WARNING.

WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY...THESE ADVISORIES ARE ISSUED FOR WINTER
EVENTS THAT ARE OF SIGNIFICANCE TO THE PUBLIC BUT DO NOT CONSTITUTE A
SERIOUS ENOUGH THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY TO WARRANT THE ISSUANCE OF
A WARNING. THESE ADVISORIES ARE ISSUED FOR LESSER ACCUMULATIONS THAN
WARNINGS.

WINTER WEATHER ADVISORIES ARE ISSUED FOR ACCUMULATIONS OF SNOW,
FREEZING RAIN, FREEZING DRIZZLE OR SLEET WHICH WILL CAUSE SIGNIFICANT
INCONVENIENCE AND MODERATELY DANGEROUS CONDITIONS. THESE POTENTIAL
WINTER EVENTS ARE EXPECTED IN THE 0 TO 36 HOUR TIME FRAME. FOR SNOW,
WHEN SNOW OF ONE QUARTER INCH TO TWO INCHES ACCUMULATING WITHIN 12
HOURS. FOR SLEET, ACCUMULATION OF ICE PELLETS LESS THAN ONE INCH. FOR
FREEZING RAIN AND FREEZING DRIZZLE, ICE ACCUMULATIONS LESS THAN ONE
INCH ARE EXPECTED. FOR WIND CHILL, WIND CHILLS OF ZERO TO -10
DEGREES.

WIND CHILL...WIND CHILL IS BASED ON THE RATE OF HEAT LOSS FROM
EXPOSED SKIN CAUSED BY THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF WIND AND COLD
TEMPERATURES. AS THE WIND INCREASES, HEAT IS CARRIED AWAY FROM THE
BODY AT AN ACCELERATED RATE, DRIVING DOWN THE BODY TEMPERATURE.
ANIMALS ARE ALSO AFFECTED BY WIND CHILL. INANIMATE OBJECTS SUCH AS
PIPES AND CAR RADIATORS ARE NOT AFFECTED. WHEN THE WIND CHILL
APPROACHES MINUS 20 DEGREES, FROSTBITE CAN OCCUR IN 15 MINUTES OR
LESS.

BLIZZARD WARNING...WARNING ISSUED FOR SUSTAINED WIND SPEEDS OR
FREQUENT GUSTS OF 35 MPH OR MORE AND FALLING AND/OR BLOWING SNOW
WHICH REDUCES VISIBILITIES TO LESS THAN ONE QUARTER OF A MILE FOR AT
LEAST 3 HOURS.

SNOW...FROZEN PRECIPITATION IN THE FORM OF WHITE OR TRANSLUCENT
HEXAGONAL ICE CRYSTALS THAT FALL AS SOFT, WHITE FLAKES.

SNOW GRAINS...PRECIPITATION OF VERY SMALL, WHITE, OPAQUE GRAINS OF
ICE SIMILAR IN STRUCTURE TO SNOW. THESE GRAINS ARE FAIRLY FLAT OR
ELONGATED. THE DIAMETERS ARE GENERALLY LESS THAN 1 MILLIMETER.

SNOW FLURRIES...INTERMITTENT LIGHT SNOWFALL OF SHORT DURATION.
GENERALLY LIGHT SNOW SHOWERS WITH NO MEASURABLE ACCUMULATION.

SNOW SHOWERS...BRIEF PERIODS OF SNOWFALL IN WHICH INTENSITY CAN BE
VARIED AND MAY CHANGE RAPIDLY. SOME ACCUMULATION IS POSSIBLE.

SNOW SQUALLS...BRIEF, INTENSE SNOW SHOWERS ACCOMPANIED BY
STRONG, GUSTY WIND. ACCUMULATION MAY BE SIGNIFICANT. SNOW SQUALLS
ARE BEST KNOW IN THE GREAT LAKES REGION.

HEAVY SNOW...SNOWFALL ACCUMULATING TO MORE THAN 2 INCHES IN DEPTH IN
12 HOURS OR LESS.

SLEET...RAIN DROPS THAT FREEZE INTO ICE PELLETS. THESE ARE
TRANSPARENT OR TRANSLUCENT PELLETS OF ICE OF 5 MILLIMETERS OR LESS
IN DIAMETER BEFORE REACHING THE GROUND. SLEET USUALLY BOUNCES WHEN
HITTING A SURFACE AND DOES NOT STICK TO OBJECTS. HOWEVER, IT CAN
ACCUMULATE LIKE SNOW AND CAUSE A HAZARD TO MOTORISTS AND
PEDESTRIANS.

FREEZING RAIN...RAIN THAT FALLS ONTO A SURFACE WITH A TEMPERATURE
BELOW FREEZING. THIS CAUSES IT TO FREEZE ON CONTACT WITH THESE
SURFACES. AN ICE COATING OR GLAZE CAN FORM ON TREES, CARS AND
ROADS. EVEN SMALL ACCUMULATIONS OF ICE CAN BECOME A SIGNIFICANT
HAZARD.

FREEZING DRIZZLE...DRIZZLE THAT FALLS ONTO A SURFACE WITH A
TEMPERATURE BELOW FREEZING. THIS CAUSES IT TO FREEZE ON CONTACT WITH
THESE SURFACES. AN ICE COATING OR GLAZE CAN FORM ON TREES, CARS AND
ROADS. EVEN SMALL ACCUMULATIONS OF ICE CAN BECOME A SIGNIFICANT
HAZARD. DRIZZLE PARTICLES ARE SMALLER THAN RAINDROPS AND TYPICALLY
DO NOT ACCUMULATE AS MUCH AS RAIN.

FROSTBITE...DAMAGE TO BODY TISSUE CAUSED BY TISSUE BEING FROZEN.
FROSTBITE CAUSES THE LOSS OF FEELING AND A WHITE OR PALE APPEARANCE
IN EXTREMITIES SUCH AS FINGERS, TOES, EAR LOBES OR THE TIP OF THE
NOSE. IF SYMPTOMS ARE DETECTED, SLOWLY WARM THE AFFECTED AREAS AND
SEEK MEDICAL HELP IMMEDIATELY.

HYPOTHERMIA...THE LOSS OF HEAT FROM THE BODY. WARNING SIGNS ARE
UNCONTROLLABLE SHIVERING, MEMORY LOSS AND DISTORTION. MEDICAL
TREATMENT SHOULD BE SOUGHT IMMEDIATELY.

WEDNESDAY'S WINTER WEATHER TOPIC WILL BE WINTER WEATHER AND YOU.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT

    JIM STEFKOVICH
    METEOROLOGIST IN CHARGE
    NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
    BIRMINGHAM, AL
    205-664-3010

OR VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT WWW.SRH.NOAA.GOV/BMX

$$

Coldest Morning So Far

| 5:52 am November 13, 2012

An all new edition of the ABC 33/40 Weather Xtreme video is available in the player on the right sidebar of the blog. You can subscribe to the Weather Xtreme video on iTunes by clicking here.

SUB-FREEZING: Here is a look at some 5:00 a.m. temperatures across the great state of Alabama….

Black Creek (northeast of Gadsden) 27
Russellville 27
Fayette 29
Haleyville 30
Valley Head 30
Decatur 30
Concord 32
Birmingham 33

These are not the lows of the day, temperatures should drop another 2-4 degrees.

We warm into the mid 50s today with a good supply of sunshine.

TOMORROW: A rather strong short wave will bring some clouds into Alabama tomorrow, but the low levels are very dry, and despite the robust upward motion provided by the wave, we will leave the forecast dry and just mention increasing clouds. We will begin the day well down in the 30s again with another freeze potential, then warming into the mid 50s… about 10 degrees below the average high of 65.

THURSDAY/FRIDAY: These two days will feature a partly to mostly sunny sky with a high in the 59-64 degree range. To the east, a low will form off the South Atlantic coast that has potential to bring some rain to places like Savannah and Charleston.

THE ALABAMA WEEKEND: Not much change as a benign weather pattern continues. The sky should be mostly sunny Saturday and Sunday with a high in the low to mid 60s, with morning lows in the 36-43 degree range. Another nor’easter will impact New Jersey and Long Island, but it won’t be as intense as the last one.

THANKSGIVING WEEK: The weather stays dry in Alabama for the first half of the week (Monday through Wednesday), with highs in the low to mid 60s and lows between 35-45 degrees. Then, on Thanksgiving Day, a passing cold front will bring a chance of showers, but the latest runs have suggested that rain amounts won’t be too heavy. Cooler and drier air returns for “Black Friday”. See the Weather Xtreme video for the graphics and thoughts on national weather since so many will be traveling.

The good news is that the last few runs of the GFS have shown no severe weather setups for Alabama for the rest of November, and we all know the weather can get pretty rough around here this time of the year as we are now in the core of our fall tornado season.

WEATHER BRAINS: Don’t forget you can listen to our weekly 90 minute netcast anytime on the web, or on iTunes. This is the show all about weather featuring many familiar voices, including our meteorologists here at ABC 33/40. Scroll down for the show notes on the new episode we recorded last night.

CONNECT: You can find me on all of the major social networks…

Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus

I will be doing a weather program this morning at Striplin Elementary School in Gadsden… be looking for the next Weather Xtreme video here by 4:00 this afternoon… enjoy the day!

WeatherBrains 355: Social Media Cranks

| 5:00 am November 13, 2012

WeatherBrains Episode 355 is now online (November 12, 2012). If you are crazy about weather, this is THE netcast audio program for you!

Justin Gehrts is our guest panelist for this show. He is the weekend morning meteorologist at KCRG-TV9 in Cedar Rapids, IA.

And joining us as our guest WeatherBrains are Kim Wilson and Brad Panovich, from WCNC-TV in Charlotte, NC.

Kim WilsonKim Wilson is the Founder of SocialNewsDesk, the only social media management solution built for newsrooms. After graduating from the University of Florida, Kim began her career in Television News as an assistant to Dan Rather at CBS News. She went on to become Executive Producer of News at WJXT-TV in Jacksonville, FL prior to founding SocialNewsDesk.

SocialNewsDesk is a web-based software suite which transforms the way news organizations interact with social media. The platform allows customized monitoring and cultivation of news content using one specially designed interface. It establishes and enforces best practices and enables journalists and media organizations to engage with their Fans using custom-designed Facebook applications. More than 250 newsrooms nationwide are currently using the SocialNewsDesk platform.

Kim is a contributor to several popular social media blogs including LostRemote.com and has been published at Mashable.com, Journalistics.com and others. She has served as a member of the University of Florida’s Advisory Council to the College of Journalism since 2004 and regularly teaches in the University’s Telecommunications Department as an Adjunct Lecturer.

Other discussions in this weekly podcast include topics like:

  • Extremes: 84 at Plant City, FL, Punta Gorda, FL, and Sarasota-Bradenton, FL, and -13 at Worland, WY
  • Over 1 inch in Central US
  • Fort Yukon is the only weather station in Alaska to reach 100
  • JB gets a lot of buzzing
  • Gas rationing in New York City
  • and more!

Our email bag officer is continuing to handle the incoming messages from our listeners.

From The Weather Center:

WeatherBrains 101: One of the most used tools in a meteorologist’s bag is that of radar. And the latest round of radars include the ability to detect the motion of air along the radar beam, or radial. So this week our topic is that of radial velocity.

TWIWH: Bill Murray looks back at the week of November 12th.

Listener SurveyListener Surveys: Okay, we continue to drive this topic into the ground, but we really do like to hear from you. Many thanks to everyone who has taken the time to fill out the Listener Survey. The survey takes just a minute or two to complete and provides us with an opportunity to learn where you are and hear your thoughts and comments on the show. Click here to take the survey.

Web Sites from Episode 355:

Kim Wilson’s Web Site

Social News Desk

SkyDaver’s Blog for all the links

Picks of the Week:

JB Elliott – No pick this week

Justin Gehrts – Central Iowa tornado survey from NWS Des Moines, IA

Nate Johnson – High Shear Lo CAPE CSTAR Project

Brad Panovich – Great Blue Norther of Nov. 11, 1911

Brian Peters – Gets the Horn

Kevin Selle – Digital Meteorologist Blog

James Spann – HPC Presentation on Snow Forecasting

JP Spann – Veterans Day Weekend Tornado Outbreak of Nov. 11, 2002, Service Assessment

The WeatherBrains crew includes your host, James Spann, plus other notable geeks like JB Elliott, Nate Johnson, Kevin Selle, and Brian Peters. They bring together a wealth of weather knowledge and experience for another fascinating netcast about weather.

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