Arlene Only the Second Tropical Storm in Modern Era of Atlantic Hurricanes

| April 21, 2017 @ 4:30 am

When Tropical Storm Arlene formed over the North Central Atlantic on Wednesday, it was unusual in several regards.

First it came from a non-tropical origin, developing as a subtropical depression. It gradually developed the warm core of a tropical system on Thursday and then surprised forecasters by increasing to tropical storm strength.

Secondly, it is only the second named Tropical Storm in history to form in April. The first was Tropical Ana in 2003. That isn’t to say that there might not have been others before the satellite era, but in any case, it is a rare storm.

There was a subtropical storm in April of 1993 as well, but the National Hurricane Center didn’t give them names back then.

FAST FACTS ON ARLENE AS OF 4 AM CST
———————————————-
LOCATION…40.0N 48.0W
ABOUT 1135 MI…1825 KM WNW OF THE AZORES
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…50 MPH…85 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT…W OR 270 DEGREES AT 31 MPH…50 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…993 MB…29.33 INCHES

Arlene will dissipate as it is absorbed by a non-tropical low at some point in the next 24 hours or so.

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Bill Murray is the President of The Weather Factory. He is the site's official weather historian and a weekend forecaster. He also anchors the site's severe weather coverage. Bill Murray is the proud holder of National Weather Association Digital Seal #0001 @wxhistorian

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