Central Alabama’s Most Detailed Seven Day Forecast

Monday, November 19th, 2018 – Morning Edition
Forecaster: Scott Martin (@ScottMartinWx on Twitter)

DRY FOR MOST OF YOUR MONDAY, FEW SHOWERS POSSIBLE LATE
A small impulse associated with a surface front will bring a small chance of a few showers to the area during the late afternoon through the pre-dawn hours on Tuesday. It will take a while for the air to moisten up enough for rain to make it to the surface, but eventually, the virga will turn into showers. Rain chances will be around 30-50% with the higher chances occurring in the northwestern parts of Central Alabama and be on a gradual decrease as the impulse moves eastward. Afternoon highs will top out in the upper 50s to the upper 60s across the area from northwest to southeast. Lows will be in the upper 30s to the lower 50s. Amounts will end up less than 1/4-inch.

NICE BUT COOL WEATHER RETURNS THROUGH MIDWEEK
After the surface front moves through, we return to a dry weather pattern but the temperatures will be running around 5-10 degrees cooler than what we saw during the weekend. Skies will be clearing on Tuesday with sunny skies expected on Wednesday. Afternoon highs will be in the mid-50s to the lower 60s.

NICE WEATHER FOR THANKSGIVING DAY
With high pressure in control of our weather in Central Alabama, conditions will be perfect for spending time with your friends and family on the holiday of thanks. Skies will be mostly sunny and highs will be in the upper 50s to the lower 60s.

UMBRELLAS MAY BE NEEDED FOR THE BIG SHOPPING WEEKEND
Another disturbance moves into the southeast on Friday, bringing with it a good chance of showers for late Friday through a good part of Saturday morning. It looks like we’ll stay dry during the early morning shopping hours on Friday, but by the early evening, rainfall will become likely. Looks like we’ll have a window of dry weather for a while on Saturday afternoon, possibly long enough for the Iron Bowl to be rain-free. A few scattered showers may return for Saturday night into Sunday morning before rain moves out by Sunday evening. Highs will be in the upper 50s to the lower 60s on Friday, into the upper 50s to the mid-60s on Saturday, and even warmer into the lower to the upper 60s on Sunday.

THE TROPICS
No areas of interest across the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, or the Caribbean Sea, and no new tropical cyclone development is expected throughout the next 5 days. Only 11 more days of the Atlantic Hurricane Season left for 2018.

BEACH FORECAST CENTER
Get the latest weather and rip current forecasts for the beaches from Fort Morgan to Panama City on our Beach Forecast Center page. There, you can select the forecast of the region that you are interested in.

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ON THIS DAY IN WEATHER HISTORY
1988 – Strong thunderstorms developed during the mid-morning hours and produced severe weather across eastern Texas and the Lower Mississippi Valley into the wee hours of the night. Thunderstorms spawned twenty-one tornadoes, including thirteen in Mississippi. One tornado killed two persons and injured eleven others at Nettleton MS, and another tornado injured eight persons at Tuscaloosa AL. Thunderstorms produced baseball size hail in east Texas and northern Louisiana, and Summit MS was deluged with six inches of rain in four hours.