So, How Does Snow Form Anyhow?

| November 7, 2018 @ 2:30 pm

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(Credit: Met Office, United Kingdom)

DISCUSSION: As we head through Fall and every into every incoming Winter season, many people often continue to ponder and wonder about various things and mysteries pertaining to winter weather. One such thing which people wonder about during Winter is how and why snowfall forms during various types of winter weather events. Attached below is a neat discussion courtesy of the Met Office over in the United Kingdom which describes how and why snowfall forms.

“What is snow?

Snow is defined as ‘solid precipitation which occurs in a variety of minute ice crystals at temperatures well below 0 °C but as larger snowflakes at temperatures near 0 °C’. It is one of the UK’s most striking weather phenomena causing a transformation of the world around us, but it can also lead to the potential for disruption.

How does snow form?

Snow forms when tiny ice crystals in clouds stick together to become snowflakes. If enough crystals stick together, they’ll become heavy enough to fall to the ground.
Snowflakes that descend through moist air that is slightly warmer than 0 °C will melt around the edges and stick together to produce big flakes. Snowflakes that fall through cold, dry air produce powdery snow that does not stick together.
Snow is formed when temperatures are low and there is moisture in the atmosphere in the form of tiny ice crystals.

How cold does it have to be to snow?

Precipitation falls as snow when the air temperature is below 2 °C. It is a myth that it needs to be below zero to snow. In fact, in this country, the heaviest snowfalls tend to occur when the air temperature is between zero and 2 °C. The falling snow does begin to melt as soon as the temperature rises above freezing, but as the melting process begins, the air around the snowflake is cooled.

Snowfall can be defined as ‘slight’, ‘moderate’ or ‘heavy’. When combined with strong winds, a snowfall can create blizzards and drifts. If the temperature is warmer than 2 °C then the snowflake will melt and fall as sleet rather than snow, and if it’s warmer still, it will be rain.”

To learn more about this topic from this article, click on the article link which can be found here!

To learn more about other weather educational topics, be sure to click here!

© 2018 Meteorologist Jordan Rabinowitz

AlabamaWX is pleased to partner with the Global Weather and Climate Center team for outstanding posts about our atmosphere. Visit them at https://www.globalweatherclimatecenter.com for more great information!

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